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Professional Services Marketing

How do you differentiate a law firm?

What makes an ad agency relevant?

How can you tell one accounting firm from another?

Can brand-building really help a consulting firm win more business?

Professional services take away problems and capture benefits. This is why they exist. This applies to law firms, consultancies, advertising agencies, architects, wealth management or private banking services, creative agencies, and accounting firms. If they do it right they are rewarded with long-term, mutually beneficial relationships.

Professional services are fascinating. Tom Peters, management consultant and author, has said, “The professional service firm – with its obsession with clients and projects – must be the new organization model.” Yet, professional services are tough businesses to brand because the promise is intangible and requires a leap-of-faith purchase.

Professional Service Essence

Whether it be a consulting, accounting, advertising or architecture firm, common characteristics apply. Each involves a specialty that demands highly talented people (who can be highly demanding). Most firms pursue deliver services that are repeatable and trainable to efficiently and effectively grow revenue. And though these services are offered to a variety of clients, they must be delivered in a customized way demanding high levels of face-to-face interaction.

The essence of professional services is that they prepare clients for the future, preempt the undesirable, control what can be controlled, and identify new opportunities.

Because of these commonalities, firms tend to share the same business model. They rely on  leverage in organizational design for profitability, structure and process, and career path strategies.

In terms of business development, they become hunter or farmer. Then they endlessly debate how best to go-to-market and usually arrive at an unnecessarily complex matrix involving a combination of service, geography, industry, and/or client segmentation. They bore the market because they are talking to themselves.

The vast majority of firms are too flexible when it comes to strategic positioning. They react to any new opportunity or chase any expression of interest from a prospect, making them quite willing to deviate from “strategy.” They are known to chase fads. Or they bluntly apply defined service offerings to a broad range of client business problems, epitomizing the maxim, “If you only have a hammer, everything looks like a nail.”

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Changing a Brand Name

This bit of prose does not retread the familiar ground in brand naming. A plethora of articles, papers, blogs and books already exist to inform you about the elements of an excellent brand name. A few of them will even share the methodologies that uncover names like Pinterest, iPad, or SoyJoy (too few because most naming consultants consult a thesaurus and then write up an invoice). All of these jottings suggest the name is the linchpin of one’s entire brand strategy.

What is covered here is an aspect of naming not discussed by brand owners and agencies. That is, making the decision to change the name and the emotions and trepidations felt by the decision-makers. When I encountered hesitation or fit-brainstorming-sessionopposition to changing a corporate or product name from clients in my earlier days, I became frustrated. Having witnessed this psychology through the years, I understand the reluctance and now have proper guidance to frame and address these concerns. These I happily share here.

Historically, I have dealt with clients who have made the firm decision to change their brand name. There was no discussion or debate on that accord. Any discussion and debate was held until naming options were presented. Now, clients have recently engaged my services with the intent to rename but with no firm commitment to follow-through. This has been fascinating.

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