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Creativity: The Rituals and Routines

Recently my stepdaughter shared an article called Rise and Shine: The Daily Routines of History’s Most Creative Minds. She is entering the creative and competitive world of acting and writing in film and television. In sharing she could not help but note that I am well practiced in the routines of coffee, long walks, and inebriation (aren’t I the greatest influence?).

All family kidding aside, I struggle with the discipline and creativity required by writing. Writing is so much of what I do now. Branding and marketing requires conveying relevant and different ideas so I have always honed this talent. Now I am writing fiction and screenplays, as well as, ghostwriting for others. I like to think I am getting better at the craft but that does not mean it gets any easier.

Oliver Burkman’s article is a review of Mason Currey’s book, Daily Rituals: How Artists Work. In it Currey notes that Joyce Carol Oats worked the morning, took a big break and cranked up again in the evening. Anthony Trollope set the goal of 250-words per quarter-hour. Meanwhile, Friedrich Schiller could only write in the presence of the smell of rotting apples (for me it’s fermenting grapes).

I like background noise and always have. Since studying in high school and university, the tunes or television have been on. As I type this blog on my computer, one earbud is in place hooked to my tablet where Better Call Saul is in rotation.

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Inspired Slope-side Design

Architects Peter Pichler and Pavol Mikolaycha have vision. They took a piece of land at 2,000m in the Italian Alps and decided to do something different. The Obereggen Mountain Hut appears to grow out of the hill.

Set next to the Oberholz cable station, the hut is a modern take on the classic Stube. Those structures dot mountain ranges in Europe and get the name from the living room or parlour … the heated part of a traditional farmhouse.

The Obereggen Mountain Hut is houses a restaurant and is split into three main sections. Each window on the end faces a different mountain. The building is entirely wood. Spruce was used for the structure and interior, larch for the facade, and oak for the furniture. A sunken design ensures ensures fabulous views. We applaud the ingenuity and year round utility.

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