Creativity: The Rituals and Routines

Recently my stepdaughter shared an article called Rise and Shine: The Daily Routines of History’s Most Creative Minds. She is entering the creative and competitive world of acting and writing in film and television. In sharing she could not help but note that I am well practiced in the routines of coffee, long walks, and inebriation (aren’t I the greatest influence?).

All family kidding aside, I struggle with the discipline and creativity required by writing. Writing is so much of what I do now. Branding and marketing requires conveying relevant and different ideas so I have always honed this talent. Now I am writing fiction and screenplays, as well as, ghostwriting for others. I like to think I am getting better at the craft but that does not mean it gets any easier.

Oliver Burkman’s article is a review of Mason Currey’s book, Daily Rituals: How Artists Work. In it Currey notes that Joyce Carol Oats worked the morning, took a big break and cranked up again in the evening. Anthony Trollope set the goal of 250-words per quarter-hour. Meanwhile, Friedrich Schiller could only write in the presence of the smell of rotting apples (for me it’s fermenting grapes).

I like background noise and always have. Since studying in high school and university, the tunes or television have been on. As I type this blog on my computer, one earbud is in place hooked to my tablet where Better Call Saul is in rotation.

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Too Cool? Men’s Fashion Brand Naming

A fun day in my life was when I happened across the brand Scotch and Soda. Originally launched in the 80’s, the brand was revamped in 2001. My affection was, and is, for the name. If I had the gumption to start a clothing brand then “scotch and soda” would be a gutsy moniker I would be proud of.

Recently, I was surfing and shopping. You know, that time wasting trend of attempting to satisfy more complex needs through hollow and vacuous retail therapy. The activity turned out to be more rewarding and fulfilling than expected because of the men’s wear brand names I happened across.

Still, none of them made me buy more or switch my favourites. They did, however, catch my attention. Consider the first up: A Fish Named Fred. That name conjured a tinge of nostalgia for the John Cleese and Jamie-Lee Curtis movie. Overall, it was a foreshadowing of the extreme irreverence that these brands draw upon and strive for.

Then came ArboristBespoken and Cheap Monday. A tree trimmer, elite, and price sensitive offer all install different meanings. Next consider the brands called EmbellishFilling Pieces, and Fish N Chips. They sound like Michael Chabon or Irvine Welsh novels.

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TV Spots that are Spot-On

Where are those loud pundits in the ad industry who forecasted the death of the 30 second television ad? Here we are and video in all forms is stronger than ever. Check out five notable recent ads of varying length and why we like them.

Costa Rica: PSA

Sometimes what you think is happening is not. This ad reminds us of a fact and balances the direction of our compassion. The dog is a great actor as well.

Notes: Take Note

This kind of thing has been done before (what hasn’t?), however, the execution is engaging. It also gets a bit uncomfortable. Not all is peaches and cream in life. Even with communications there is miscommunication and that is why this will stay with you for some time.

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Inspired Slope-side Design

Architects Peter Pichler and Pavol Mikolaycha have vision. They took a piece of land at 2,000m in the Italian Alps and decided to do something different. The Obereggen Mountain Hut appears to grow out of the hill.

Set next to the Oberholz cable station, the hut is a modern take on the classic Stube. Those structures dot mountain ranges in Europe and get the name from the living room or parlour … the heated part of a traditional farmhouse.

The Obereggen Mountain Hut is houses a restaurant and is split into three main sections. Each window on the end faces a different mountain. The building is entirely wood. Spruce was used for the structure and interior, larch for the facade, and oak for the furniture. A sunken design ensures ensures fabulous views. We applaud the ingenuity and year round utility.

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Paying Homage to Brands…Irreverently

Since I have been in branding and that is not a short time, strategists and creatives have had fun with brands and the notion of branding. When not using branding to advance businesses, these folks find ways to mash things up or pay homage to the power of a brand … often with bizarre mixes of satire, irony and irreverent reverence. Consider the following ten creative takes:

Vino Logos

Thomas Ollivier actually did 99 of these. Brands as wine is a fine idea but the Tabasco variety would take some getting used to. We wonder what how the Uber wine would be described.

 

 

Well Heeled
After his Pepsi-Mondrian can, Italian designer Andrea Salamino explored the idea if brands were sneakers what would they look like? Works for us.

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Dissecting FT Weekend’s New Branding

Two months ago The Financial Times refreshed FT Weekend. This was introduced through an integrated marketing campaign “aimed at a growing readership who favour the immersive experience of print on the weekend while remaining highly engaged with digital journalism during the week.” That is an insightful and challenging objective.

What piqued my interest was the print component. The campaign’s tagline grabbed me (isn’t it great when that happens?). The three lines are compelling. “World-class writing” is sharp and smart. I can see how they arrived at it and am grateful they did. The cornerstone of journalism is a free press. That means possessing honesty and objectivity and marrying them with insight. Those are lofty ideals to sell a paper. Perhaps too lofty and I expect FT and their advertising agency thought so too.

Instead they now focus on global reach and fresh perspective along with how they write and communicate. The three words in the tagline are absolutely power-packed. The line represents the core skill-set of journalism and what must be the overriding differentiator of any publication online, off or both. That is quality of writing. As far as I know no other publication is landing on that notion or boldly claiming it even though it is fundamental.

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The Appeal of Writing Cabins

You do not have to be a writer to want a private little cabin…but it helps. The solitude, peace and focus could keep the words flowing. Here is a question, could you go without Internet in your small pad? Author Jonathan Franzen writes in the big city but on a computer without online connection. And that is the point, to make sense of the world either through fiction or nonfiction, you have to disconnect. Imagine doing so in any of these tiny muses.

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Turf War?: Consultancies and Agencies

Consulting firms have always sized-up the marketing space as a potential service offering. They have flirted with it for decades. Most large-scale forays have ended up in retreat after just a few years. Meanwhile, ad agencies have long-looked to shore up their dusty, old revenue models and expand by purportedly delivering more strategic offers. This too, has been largely episodic and unsuccessful.

Stick around and I will tell you why neither have historically worked but why they may work now. First off let’s substantiate that this mash-up is taking place:

  • Eight of North America’s top 10 agencies are owned by consultancies. Accenture has acquired at least 40 of them. Deloitte, Accenture, KPMG, PwC, and McKinsey now have agency arms.
  • Deloitte is out to create “the world’s first creative digital consultancy.” Meanwhile, IBM’s digital agency unit, iX, has over 10,000 employees and 1,000 designers in 25 offices worldwide.
  • Del Monte Foods selected Epsilon as its U.S. creative agency of record reflecting a fresh focus on data-driven marketing and a move away from traditional advertising agencies.
  • PwC made waves in 2016 when they appointed their first Chief Creative Officer. It should be noted that PwC also named a Chief Purpose Officer, which seems very much like an agency-thing-to-do.
  • Omnicom created Hearts & Science, an integrated digital agency leveraging technology to scale customer relationships. It has attracted Proctor & Gamble and AT&T as clients.
  • Razorfish, a division of Publicis Groupe, partnered with Adobe to build its own digital marketing platform.
  • Starcom MediaVest Group launched marketing consulting brand Zero Dot and sibling Zenith soft-launched a media-focused consultancy called Apex.
  • R/GA and GroupM now offer broad-based consulting services for the purposes of higher margins while securing traditional ad business. This is the strategy of O&M’s strategy consultancy, Ogilvy Red. Carla Hendra, global chairman of Ogilvy Red, is quoted as saying, “If we sell $1 of consulting work, down the road it can lead to $3 to $4 dollars of communications work.”

Clearly, traditional lines are crossing and blurring but why?

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How to Differentiate Gum

Talk about a crowded category. It is tough to chew through all the options. How do you choose a gum brand? It is a rare product where price is not really a consideration. Let’s face it. Gum is a commodity. I would rather be a bottled water brand manager. When I walk up to the “wall of gum” in a convenience store I just grab what is convenient. Brand name, type of packaging, colours, logos, flavour, brand owner…none of it matters. But I do have a differentiating idea. Look for it after I prove my point of commoditization with these photos…

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Jeff Chats Canadian Brands

This article originally appeared in The Globe and Mail.

It works for Canada Goose, but how far can ‘made in Canada’ go? by Shelley White

Sun, sand and surf are not three things we’re internationally renowned for in Canada. Yet one of our hottest exports of the moment is Shan, a line of chic, high-end resort and swimwear that is designed and manufactured entirely in Laval, Que.

In addition to flagship stores in Montreal and Toronto, Shan has boutiques in Miami and the Hamptons, and 65 per cent of its revenue comes from the 30-odd countries it ships to, says Jean-François Sigouin, vice-president at Shan.

Shan is a line of high-end resort and swimwear that is designed and manufactured in Laval, Que., which allows it to retain full control over its product. As 65 per cent of its revenue comes from abroad, the “Made in Canada” brand works for the company because its international buyers recognize that to mean quality, the company says.

The suits aren’t cheap – they run about $300 each – but that’s sort of the point, says Mr. Sigouin.

“The philosophy of the brand is to offer quality instead of quantity,” he says. By manufacturing in Laval instead of overseas, the company has full control over its product. “We are totally vertically integrated from the design to production to retail because we have everything in the same building.”

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