Marketing’s Golden Rule

Recently, I was named one of the 50 Over 50 Marketing Thought Leaders by Brand Quarterly. Beyond enjoying the honor and sharing my age with the publication’s entire readership, I was stumped by a bit of the process. BQ asked me to provide my “marketing mantra” and how it makes better marketers. It seemed like an easy request at first glance.

Then I got it into and quickly discovered I subscribed to many. Perhaps too many. So I sorted through them to see if there was commonality. I also looked for something fresh but compelling and by no way contrived. In the end, I brand-quarterly1landed on the notion of the Marketing Golden Rule. It is a representation of what I have witnessed and experienced as both marketer and consumer. The Marketing Golden Rule speaks honestly to the relationship between buyer and seller.

What is Your Marketing Mantra?

Always ask, “How would I like to be marketed to?” I don’t want to be fooled. I am not looking for false promises. I do not want to be entertained for entertainment sake. I am seeking fit with a brand. This modified ‘golden rule’ keeps the focus on reciprocity. Marketing is a relationship, a two-way street, a process to achieve mutual benefit between people and brands. People expect marketing but do not want to be sold. They want to be valued, heard, and feel special. This makes the profession and practice a profoundly human activity.

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How does Following this Mantra Make Better Marketers?

Marketing facilitates sales by respecting and helping people make the best decisions concerning what, how, and when to buy what they need and want. David Ogilvy said, “The customer is not a moron. She’s your wife.” He was imploring marketers to truly know who may buy what is being sold. This demands an understanding of an individual’s situation and personal motivations to provide an objective rationale and honest justification for every purchase.

Marketing is the study of human behavior and our behavior has not changed in centuries. It has been consistent from ancient open-air markets to modern online exchanges, from Pompeii to eBay. We are both rational and irrational, and we frequently confuse our needs with our wants.

This makes marketing an amazing profession. It is a mix of psychology, data science, pop culture, history, sociology, music, consumer behavior, design, neuroscience, writing and literature, mathematics and so much more. This complex cocktail does not set out to overtly sell, it strategically and creatively promises and proves.

Increasingly marketing is technology-led and data-driven. Marketers are overwhelmed by reams of information. Every brand I work with is inundated with data. It is not making them better at marketing. T.S. Eliot got it right, he asked, “Where is the knowledge we have lost in information?” Data is great if it produces human insights that incite. It sucks when a spreadsheet replaces intimate knowledge of a customer.

Marketing connects on a human level. Consumers expect brands to market to them. Equally so, they expect brands to empathize and understand them. Marketers that hide behind vague, lofty claims or attach inordinate emphasis to dispassionate technology or fail to prove their promises will facilitate few sales because in this there is no relevance, honesty, value or humanity.

Broadly speaking there are two types of people in marketing. There are those who like to fool people and there are those who like to serve people. It is time our profession cast off the old-school, jaded types who believe marketing is about creating myths and trying to snow people with them. We need to celebrate those who know it is about finding a truth that connects people and brands for mutual benefit. All of this starts by asking, “How would I like to be marketed to?”

Cheers, Jeff Swystun

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Trends in Association Branding

Years ago I spoke at a conference focused on crafting association business strategies. This was in the late nineties while in the Marketing and Customer Management Practice at PW (now PwC). My work to that point focused on professional service businesses and consumer products. To tell the truth I was filling in for a colleague who fell ill.

The presentation went well but it was the conversations following that stuck with me. In short, I was rocked by the complexities of the industry and the challenges faced by these entities. iacpconferencephoto1-520x346Associations have always been “up against it”. All share certain issues. After working with four associations in the past two years, we have discovered the following:

Cost Not a Benefit: in many cases, members join to maintain accreditation or there is a penalty for not keeping membership but not necessarily claimable upsides.

The “Nonprofit” Label: it suggests a softer culture, less talented employees than the private sector (but stronger than the public sector!), and lack of depth and sophistication in leadership, management and planning. Let me be clear…this is perception not reality.

Overlap: one only has to look at the marketing and advertising industry to see that an agency in the United States could belong to easily over twenty different associations. Imagine being a retailer or in healthcare and that number is many times higher. This makes it important for associations to differentiate. When you think about it associations are competing against every other association out there and be held to the standards of the best. Also note there are associations for every conceivable group in the world…there are even several associations for associations!

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