Stop Writing to Write Better

There are two terms writers detest. The first is, “writer’s block”. The second is. “The bar is closing.” In all seriousness, getting stuck is frustrating. Writing is a complex act. It is self-expression. Writing shares ideas and stories. Everyone has those in the head and heart. We may understand them but putting them down on paper so others do is an awesome challenge.

I believe in the power of persistence but when you get stuck, forcing writing does not always work. Determination is admirable but it often produces an inferior result. When this happens and it can imagehappen with alarming frequency, you have to step away.

Go for a hike, pick up an adult coloring book, wear out a treadmill – anything that will quiet your mind. If you stop focusing on the block often the solution will present itself. One perceived step backwards can take you two real steps forward.

Even if this does not produce an amazing epiphany that miraculously breaks the mental logjam, you will find a few threads that can be pulled. Those will invariably lead you in the right direction. The point is to walk away. You have to stop writing to write better. There are a few reasons why.

Breathe

It can be a blog, novel, annual report or poem. We pour ourselves into the words and ideas. The sentiment and emotion is draining. Just a few sentences in we have lost all objectivity. It is analogous to having a heated argument with a loved one. They have their point-of-view and we have ours. There is a natural give and take but we are not going to budge on the core bits. You have to take some time, breathe, and see it from the other side.

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The Best in Cause Marketing

Swystun Communications contributed to PRNews’ 7th edition of the CSR and Green Guidebook. Our paper, Changing People’s Behavior: 8 Best Practices in Cause Marketing, is included along with submissions from JetBlue and Time Warner Cable. We cover the efforts of Uber, LUSH, H&M and Gucci. You can purchase it here and here is an excerpt on Gucci’s “Chime for Change”…

Building on the survey results and interviews, we looked at a select number of campaigns cited as best practice examples. One we heard repeatedly was Gucci’s “Chime for Change”. Robert Triefus, Gucci’s Chief Marketing Officer describes the investment, ”Chime for Change aims to realize a world where girls and women have the safety and protection they need to 1. Gucci Chime Adthrive.”

It was launched at TED and backed by celebrity endorsements from Salma Hayek and Frida Giannini. It has since thrown a mega-concert headlined by Beyonce, Madonna and Jennifer Lopez. Recently it hosted Chimehack 2, “a female hackathon to develop solutions for relevant challenges in today’s world.” Chime for Change has been lauded for directly engaging consumers using a crowd-funding platform called Catapult.

For all of this they get admirable press. Yet, outside of the fashion industry, precious few people have actually heard of it. Respondents noted that Chime for Change has fallen for two common traps in cause marketing. The first involves celebrity. Celebrities are often used as avatars for the cause and a quick way to raise awareness.

This presents a long-term disconnect as consumers may desire to be a celebrity but they cannot easily relate to them. It produces an artificial association with the cause. Second, the cause leverages big events that generate press releases but questionable results. Chime for Change is an amazing premise executed in a traditional way. One respondent said she would be surprised if 1 in 100 of Gucci’s own customers have heard of the program.

8. LUSH a little does a lot

Anticipating through Design: Putting People First

In the twilight of his career, Andy Warhol, stated, “I was always a commercial artist.” Warhol’s success had long invited criticism from design purists. The 6a981a98957a837141a5e2be3fc71c87famous pop artist never saw a conflict, having said, “Being good in business is the most fascinating kind of art.” Today, companies are spending more time, effort and money on design. Apple, Philips, Nike, Nest, and Sonos are making the effort and investing more because it works.

Warhol’s view of business and art helps define an approach I coined called People-First Design. The goal is to make it seem that when someone experiences a product or service it feels like it has been designed for him or her alone. This means cleverly balancing utility and aesthetics. Increasingly customers are rewarding companies for products and services that just seem “to fit”.

People-First Design differs from other design constructs because it anticipates nikefuelbanded-1384457340consumer needs and wants. Simply put, it delivers “what’s next”. Akio Morito, co-founder of Sony, and Steve Jobs, Apple visionary, spouted nearly identical quotes on the topic. Morito said, “The public does not know what is possible, we do.” Jobs commented, “people don’t know what they want until you show it to them.” The Sony Walkman and Apple iPod are cases in point.

People-First Design can benefit every company. Design needs to lead the product development process. Jobs noted the opportunity this represents, “We don’t have a good language to talk about this kind of thing. In most people’s vocabularies, design means veneer… But to me, nothing could be further from the meaning of design. Design is the fundamental soul of a man-made creation.”

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Love It: 750 Million Packets of Lovehearts

This blog was posted on Valentine’s Day for obvious reasons. Love Hearts candy were one of my favourites growing up. It was actually for the taste not the romantic messaging (though they were fun to share with the ladies). The confectionery from Swizzels Matlow of the UK actually come in six flavours.

  • White: plain, sherbet-like, slightly tart vanilla flavour
  • Yellow: sherbet-like flavour with a distinct sharp lemon aftertaste
  • Green: slightly lime flavour with a sherbet-like aftertaste
  • Orange: sweet flavour with a slight orange aftertaste
  • Purple: unusual, slightly perfumed berry-like flavour with a strong aftertaste
  • Red: cherry flavour

 

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There are over a 150 different messages that appear on the candies. It is uncommon to find more than 3 repeats in a packet of 20. Some messages are:

  • All Yours
  • Be Mine
  • Call Me
  • Date Me
  • Dream On
  • Hot Lips
  • Kiss Me
  • My Boy
  • Text Me
  • U Rock
  • You’re Mine

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Seagram’s Ads Predicted the Future

If only The Seagram Company could have seen the future they would avoid what Charles Bronfman called, “a disaster, it is a disaster, it will be a disaster…It was a family tragedy.” He was speaking of the demise of his family’s business founded in 1857. Before the company’s ill-fated forays into entertainment and its breakup of assets that were acquired 1979_seagrams_adby Pernod Ricard, Diageo and Coca-Cola, Seagram’s developed and owned nearly 250 drink brands and was the largest distiller of alcoholic beverages in the world.

They were also one of the coolest holding companies of all time. The Seagram Building, the company’s American headquarters at 375 Park Avenue in New York City, was designed by architect Ludwig Mies van der Rohe with Philip Johnson. Seagram’s made Canadian whisky a must-have. Crown Royal, 7 Crown, 83 Canadian Whisky, Five Star Rye Whisky, and Seagram’s VO were seen as luxury liquors.

My dad drank Crown Royal exclusively. Open a particular closet in our home back then and you would have drowned in royal blue felt-like bags with a gold tasselled drawstring (later they would be purple). Crown Royal was sold in these keepsake sacs. Kids would keep marbles and other toys in them. Ladies used them for jewelry. My dad housed scores of golf balls in the plush bag.

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